Types of shops

  • corner shop - a small shop, where is a shop assistant who hands you your goods
  • self-service shop - you take a basket or a trolley and go shopping. If you have all the goods, you go to the cash desk and pay for your purchase. The goods is put into the shopping bag.
  • supermarket, hypermarket - large self-service shops
  • department store - more floors, more goods, more departments
  • Kinds of shops selling specific goods: bakery, men's wear, ironmonger, greengrocer's, grocer's (smíšené zboží), stationer's, tobacconist etc.
  • Shopping centres:
    In the suburbs of the cities there are shopping centres now - it is a complex of many hypermarkets (e.g. in Prague or Brno there are hypermarkets TESCO, IKEA, Computer Land etc.), and some other smaller shops like Mc Donald´s, Jewellery, cafés, clothes´ shops etc.
  • Going shopping
    describe your shopping, how many times a week you go shopping, which goods you can buy every day, once a week or only once a year etc.
  • [Obrázek]A department store is a store which sells many different kinds of goods, each in a separate department. Modern department stores serve the needs of entire families. People enjoy shopping in such stores because they can make all their purchases under one roof.
  • The typical department store occupies one large building, with separate departments located on a number of floors. A number provide special services, such as a travel agency or optician’s.
  • Department stores employ hundreds of people for different jobs. Employees buy, price, and sell the goods. The sales promotion manager and his staff promote the sell of merchandise (goods) through advertising and other techniques. The comptroller heads the section that keeps records and manages the store’s financial affairs. The personnel staffs hire employees and handle other employment problems.

Kinds of shops

  • bazaar – a shop for the sale of cheap goods of great variety
  • mobile shop – a covered moveable shop
  • boutique – a small shop selling fashionable clothes
  • department store – a large shop divided into smaller parts in each of which different types of goods are sold
  • kiosk – a small open hut, such as one used for selling newspaper
  • shopping arcade – a covered passage with a row of shops on either side
  • shopping centre - a group of shops of different kinds, planned and built as a whole
  • shopping precinct – a part of a town limited to shopping, often without cars
  • stall – a table or small open-fronted shop in a public place
  • store – a large shop
  • supermarket – a large shop selling mainly food where one serves oneself
  • market – open place where people meet to buy and sell goods, especially food

The Fashions of the Edwardian Period (1900 - 1910)


[Obrázek] [Obrázek]


  • The lady is dressed in the silhouette of 1904.
  • The bodice is full across the front and droops centre front.
  • The shoulders are soft and slightly extended.
  • The sleeves have an over sleeve that is 3/4 in length and a bishop under sleeve with a wide wristband.
  • The waistline is at the normal place, but it does have a dip in front, emphasized by the wide belt.
  • The skirt fits neatly over the hips and gently flares from below the knee.
  • The box pleats are stitched down to mid-calf and then released to help encourage the flare.

[Obrázek] [Obrázek]


  • The gentleman is dressed in more formal attire for day.
  • He is wearing a Prince Albert or Frock coat.
  • It is single breasted and worn unbuttoned to reveal the single breasted, collarless waistcoat below.
  • He wears a stiff front shirt with a wing tip rigid collar and a four-in-hand tie.
  • His matching trousers have a front and back crease but no cuffs.
  • He is wearing spats, a Bowler and gloves and carries a walking stick.
  • The woman is wearing a one piece gown from 1910. The neckline is finished with a small ruffle.
  • The 3/4 length sleeves have a button and loop detail that is repeated on the front of the bodice.
  • The under sleeves have a ruched cuff that finishes into a standing frill similar to the neck.
  • The waist is fitted with a matching belt.
  • The skirt has an over panel and both layers are narrow and tubular.
  • The original gown was made of linen.
  • The gentleman is wearing a 3 button Sack Suit.
  • The trousers are narrow with no cuff, but they are creased front and back.
  • His vest is done in a lighter colour fabric and is just visible at the necking of the coat.
  • He wears a striped soft front shirt with a turned over stiff collar.
  • His Four-in-Hand is a printed pattern.
  • He carries a Fedora hat, a walking stick and is wearing gloves.

Fashion terms

  • Acrylic: manufactured fibre with uneven surface that is durable & has a soft, woolly feel.
  • A-line: used to describe a dress silhouette styled narrow and close at the shoulders and flaring away from the body beginning under the arms to the hem.
  • Asymmetric: non formal balance.
  • Avant-garde: French term for "advance guard"
  • African print: dynamic and colourful print taken from traditional African dress.
  • All-weather coat: can be worn in fine or inclement weather.
  • Bodice: close-fitting upper part of a woman's dress.
  • Bustier: strapless style dress top held in place by boning.
  • Backless: exposing the back.
  • Baggies: pants that are fitted at the waist and hips but full in the legs.
  • Blazer: long sleeved sports jacket with lapels.
  • Bleached: clothes from which all colour has been removed.
  • Chiffon: thin, transparent fabric with a plain weave.
  • Cap sleeve: a very short sleeve (as on a dress) that hangs over the edge of the shoulder without extending along the underside of the arm.
  • Career dressing: a dress code for the professional woman. Usually a conservative look styled to fit into what was originally "a man’s world." The basic look includes a tailored blazer, a straight skirt, and a detailed blouse.
  • Casual wear: informal, everyday clothing. It is typical for the American life style.
  • Chic: sophisticated or stylish.
  • Circle skirt: a skirt made by cutting cloth into a circle, with the waist at the centre --- so full that it makes wave-like motion.
  • City wear: street dress that has a sophisticated fashion image.
  • Classic: traditional, timeless, describing styles that have been popular for a long time. Fashion is an ongoing cycle of new trendy and classic styles.
  • Classic prints: patterns, such as paisley and foulard, which are not affected by fashion trends.
  • Collection: a preseason showing of a designer’s line; usually held twice a year for spring/summer and fall/ winter fashions.
  • Colour coordination: the planning of an outfit by considering the relationships of the colours to be worn.
  • Contemporary: current; having the look of today; the now look.
  • Continental: characteristic of European men’s styles, featuring wide shoulders, fitted waist, and short lengths.
  • Cool colours: colours with a blue undertone and suggesting serenity. Cool colours include blue, green, and purple.
  • Corduroy: derived from the French term "cordu roi," meaning cloth of the French royalty; like denim, widely used by people of all ages.
  • Cosmopolitan: sophisticated, international.
  • Country look: an appearance evoked by wearing traditional tweeds or woven typical of the English country gentleman.
  • Crepe process: the procedure involved in shrinking the surface of silk, rayon, and acetate to create an elegant shininess.
  • Crew neck: the round neck of a sweater.
  • Duchess satin: lightweight satin weave fabric of silk or rayon.
  • Designer: one who initiates new fabric concepts.
  • Down jacket: a jacket filled with goose or duck down.
  • Earth colours: colours that are found in nature and relate to the brown family.
  • Elegance: grace and sophistication in clothing.
  • Evening dress: dress worn in the evening, for special occasions.
  • Folkloric: characteristic of ethnic styles.
  • Haute couture: a term for the top designers of custom-made clothes.
  • Jeans: originally, work clothes made of denim.
  • Jewel tones: deep hues of red, blue, green, and purple with the richness and intensity of fine gems.
  • Jump suit: a coverall or one-piece garment with pants.
  • Jacquard: elaborate patterned fabric woven or knitted on a Jacquard loom.
  • Khaki: used both as a colour and as a style of trouser.
  • Kimono sleeve: a sleeve with no distinct separation from the jacket or robe.
  • Leotard: a one-piece, close-fitting body suit, like a swimsuit; used by dancers.
  • Lingerie: women’s decorative underwear, such as a camisole, emphasizing femininity.
  • Moccasins: casual shoes of soft leather; first worn by native Americans.
  • Natural colours: colours, soft in hue and image, relating to beige.
  • Natural fibres: cotton, silk, wool, and linen, all of which occur in nature.
  • Nylon: manufactured fibre that is very strong and is resistant to both abrasion and damage from many chemicals.
  • Princess style: basic dress style using continuous vertical panels to shape the body without a waistline seam.
  • Pastel colour: a pale, soft colour made by adding white to a bright colour.
  • Polo shirt: originally, a shirt worn for polo playing; now, fashionable sportswear, often with a small logo on the chest pockets.
  • Prêt-a-porter: ready to wear.
  • Primary colours: red, blue, and yellow.
  • Print-on-print: having one pattern printed on a contrasting pattern.
  • Pullover: an outer layer, usually a sweater, without buttons.
  • Pure colour: the clearest colour value.
  • Polyester: it is an extremely resilient fibre that is smooth, crisp and particularly springy.
  • Raglan sleeve: sleeve with slanted seams extending from the underarm to the neck.
  • Satin: a weave which the warp floats over several yarns, giving a smooth finish.
  • Sailor collar: a collar that is V-shaped in front and square in back.
  • Season less dressing: a dressing style made up of clothes that work regardless of the time of year.
  • Silhouette: outline; the lay of the material; the shape of a garment.
  • Solid colour: a single colour without print or pattern.
  • Sweats: cotton jersey sportswear.
  • Synthetic fibre: fibre with no natural origin.
  • Tone-on-tone: slight variation in the shade of a single colour.
  • Transparency: texture so fine that it can be seen through.
  • Tricolour: the red, white, and blue colours of the French flag.
  • T-shape: a design that stretches across the shoulders and tapers downward.
  • Tweed: rough wool cloth originally woven in Scotland.
  • Tube top: strapless tank top.
  • Tuxedo: men’s clothes for special occasions.
  • Warm colours: colours with a red or yellow undertone and suggesting an energetic and upbeat image.
  • Wrap coat: a coat without buttons or fasteners can be tied with sash or worn open.

Patterns

  • pattern is an arrangement of lines, shapes, colours, etc. as a design
  • a checked pattern - has a regular pattern of differently coloured squares
  • a striped pattern - having lines of colour
  • a dotted pattern
  • a polka-dot pattern/ spotted - number of dots that form a pattern
  • a zig-zag pattern - a pattern that looks like a line of z´s joined together
  • a floral pattern
  • geometric patterns
  • with a pattern of tiny roses
  • plain - without patterns
  • tie-dye - a special pettern - to tie string around parts of piece of material and colour it with dye

Materials

  • cotton
  • wool
  • leather
  • mohair
  • suede
  • tweed
  • corduroy
  • velvet
  • lace
  • embroidery
  • towelling